inexorablyacademic:

sodomymcscurvylegs:

cameralinz:

“Is Draco alive? Is he in the castle?” The whisper was barely audible; her lips were an inch from his ear, her head bent so low that her long hair shielded his face from the onlookers. “Yes,” he breathed back. He felt the hand on his chest contract; her nails pierced him. Then it was withdrawn. She had sat up. “He is dead!” Narcissa Malfoy called to the watchers.

In the end, Voldemort’s fate twice came down to the choice of a woman, a mother.

Rock ‘n roll.

Harry Potter as a series repeatedly tells us never to underestimate a mother’s love. Lilly’s love for Harry nearly killed Voldemort the first time, Narcissa’s love for Draco set him up for his real death, and Voldemort’s greatest general was killed by Molly, a mother who loved all of her children and feared losing any more to the magical war.

Bitches. Get. Stuff. Done.

   (via)

Wherever perfectionism is driving, shame is riding shotgun. Perfectionism is not about healthy striving, which you see all the time in successful leaders, it’s not about trying to set goals and being the best we can be, perfectionism is basically a cognitive behavioral process that says if I look perfect, work perfect, and do everything perfectly, I can avoid shame, ridicule, and criticism. It’s a defense mechanism.

"Why Doing Awesome Work Means Making Yourself Vulnerable"

So, I’ve been waiting for someone to explain this extremely simple concept to me my entire life.

(via kelsium)

Hooooly shit I needed to read this article.

(via rouxfully)

"When I interview leaders, artists, coaches, or athletes who are very successful, they never talk about perfectionism as being a vehicle for success. What they talk about is that perfectionism is a huge trigger, one they have to be aware of all the time, because it gets in the way of getting work done."

Yyyyyyyyep.

(via rumplestiltsqueer)

velocesmells:

 Baby blue bird.

korranation:

Hey Korra Nation, BIG NEWS!!!

IF THIS PICTURE (drawn by the one-and-only Bryan K) GETS OVER 15,000 NOTES, WE’LL RELEASE OUR FIRST EXCLUSIVE CLIP FROM BOOK 4 ONLINE TOMORROW MORNING!

So what’re you waiting for? Let’s do this!!!

shavostars:

I think about pokemon in non-battle situations a lot. Like pokemon who have been trained/raised to be helpers and assistants than to be battle partners.

Pokemon visiting hospitals to cheer patients up like dogs and cats do. Or ones that help kids learn to read, speak, swim, go through therapy?! Even pokemon who’s abilities help owners with specific disabilities?!

I love thinking of pokemon outside of battle situations.

parrareru:

kings’ showdown

freckledcrow:

But like Iwa-chan was the only guy from Aobajousai that seemed worried about Kageyama at the end of the match, because he knew that Kageyama knew that Oikawa worked him out and outsmarted him and just as Iwa-chan knows that Oikawa always felt inferior to Kageyama, he also seems to have realized that Kageyama always respected Oikawa and probably felt quite inferior to him as well. And he knows Oikawa really well and how nasty he can be and how cruel of things he can pull off, and working out Kageyama was kind of one of these things, because just as Kageyama started trusting others and opening up his heart and wanted to win, not alone but with a team, Oikawa used it against him making Kageyama feel all the more like a failure, making Kageyama feel like maybe no matter what he’d do or who’d he become he’d still be inferior and not fit to play as a setter with a team. 

And Iwaizumi looks like he’s worried because Kageyama is a kid two years younger and they used to play together and he knows Kageyama is by no means evil and just.

Iwaizumi is such a great guy.

dareva:

when fans of a thing make you dislike a thing

nymphicus:

i gave up at red